Colloquium

The core of the Agrarian Studies Program’s activities is a weekly colloquium organized around an annual theme. Invited specialists send papers in advance that are the focus of an organized discussion by the faculty and graduate students associated with the colloquium.

This topic embraces, inter alia, the study of mutual perceptions between countryside and city, and patterns of cultural and material exchange, extraction, migration, credit, legal systems, and political order that link them.

It also includes an understanding of how different societies conceive of the spatial order they exhibit. What terms are meaningful and how are they related?: e.g., frontier, wilderness, arable, countryside, city, town, agriculture, commerce, “hills,” lowlands, maritime districts, inland. How have these meanings changed historically and what symbolic and material weight do they bear?


Hinterlands, Frontiers, Cities, and States: Transactions and Identities
Meetings are Fridays, 11am-1pm Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Avenue, Room 203*
*Except September 15 and November 3 in the seminar room at 230 Prospect Street

Spring 2018

January 26
Radhika Govindrajan
Anthropology, University of Washington
"On Lies, Sincerity, and the Social in an Indian Rural Election"


February 2
Cymene Howe
Anthropology and Center for Energy and Environmental Research in the Human Sciences, Rice University
"Wind Power and the Politics of Mitigation in Southern Mexico"


February 9

Gaston Gordillo
Anthropology, University of British Columbia
Ambient Thickness: The Atmospheric Materiality of the Anthropocene


February 16
Tania Li
Anthropology, University of Toronto
Customs, Commons, Co-ops and Corporations: Indonesia's 21st Century Land Reform


February 23
Paul Sutter
History, University of Colorado-Boulder
Rethinking Yellow Fever's Atlantic World History


March 2
William Rankin
History of Science and the History of Medicine, Yale University
Radical Cartography: Visual Argument in the Age of Data


March 30
Naveeda Khan
Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University
"Parties, Constituencies and their Doppelgängers: The Anti-Politics of Global Climate Governance"


April 6
Aaron Jakes
Agrarian Studies Program Fellow, Yale University
"State of the Field Restated; Agricultural Regulation and Colonial Conservatism in Egypt"


April 13
John Lee
Agrarian Studies Program Fellow, Yale University
"The Crooked Timber Bureaucracy: The Red Pine and the Making of Choson Korea, 1392-1910"


April 20
Adriana Chira
Agrarian Studies Program Fellow, Yale University
"Silencing Race: Spatial Markings and Popular Race-Making in Eastern Cuba, 1820s-1860s"


Fall 2017

September 15
Paul Freedman
History, Yale University 
"The U.S. Farm-to-Table Movement" 


September 22
Cecilia Tsu
History, UC Davis
"Harvest of Self-Help: Refugees, Community Gardening, and the Agrarian Dream" 


September 29
Aniket Aga
School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan
"The Ethical Publicity of Agri-chemicals in Western India: The Limits of Dualist Conceptions of Political Economy"


October 6
Natalia Mamonova
Political Science, The International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), The Hague
"Naive Monarchism and Rural Resistance in Contemporary Russia"


October 13
Nancy Langston
History, Michigan Technological University
"Sustaining Lake Superior: Mining, Water Quality, and Indigenous Environmental Justice"


October 27
Madeleine Reeves
Anthropology, Manchester
"Sovereign (Be)longings: State-Desire and the Anthropology of Exception"


November 3
Glenn Dynner
Religious Studies, Sarah Lawrence College
"Pogroms in Rural Poland: The Breakdown of an Age-Old Economic Symbiosis"


November 10
Fernando Santos-Granero
Anthropology, Smithsonian
"Slavery as Structure, Process or Lived Experience, or Why Slave Societies Existed in Pre-contact Tropical America"


December 1
Michael Dwyer
Political Ecology, CIFOR
"Untitled But Not Informal: State Formation and the Global Land Rush in Laos"


December 8
Pablo Lapegna
Sociology, University of Georgia
“The Argentine Soybean Boom: Agrochemical Exposure and Peasant Demobilization”